Geology
Rocks and minerals can be found in your own backyard. Explore the world around you and learn about the history of the formation of the Earth by studying geology. We've gathered resources to make it fun and interesting.
Things to See & Do in Connecticut
Farmington National Wild & Scenic River
Bordered by scenic state forests and timeworn structures, the Farmington River is celebrated for its simple beauty, abundant resources, and rich history. Conservation efforts are of great interest to the River's growing constituency. Fertile spawning grounds along rivers like the Farmington are at the heart of efforts to restore Atlantic salmon to the Connecticut River basin. Environmentalists believe that salmon will return once downstream obstacle are eliminated. Today, this flourishing freshwater habitat supports major trout and river otter populations, and is home to the state's only nesting site for bald eagles. The past comes to life along the Farmington River, with rustic mills and historic settlements gracing the riverbank. Yet, conservationists and archeologists are not the only ones who appreciate the Farmington and its and its surroundings. This picturesque area is a favorite of sports enthusiasts who fish, canoe, and kayak on the river or hike along the shoreline.
Quinebaug & Shetucket Rivers Valley National Heritage Corridor
The Quinebaug and Shetucket Rivers Valley National Heritage Corridor in northeastern Connecticut and south central MA has been called "the last green valley" in the Boston-to-Washington megalopolis. Close to Hartford, Providence, and Worcester, but far enough away to avoid urban sprawl, this 1086 square mile region remains predominately rural. It’s rivers wind through rolling hills linking region’s many small towns, farmlands, forests and mills. The Quinebaug and Shetucket Rivers Valley National Heritage Corridor is a special kind of park. It embraces 35 towns, numerous villages and a total population of about 300,000.
Appalachian National Scenic Trail
The Appalachian National Scenic Trail is a 2,180-mile footpath along the ridgecrests and across the major valleys of the Appalachian Mountains from Katahdin in Maine to Springer Mountain in northern Georgia. It traverses the scenic, wooded, pastoral, wild, and culturally resonant lands of the Appalachian Mountains. Conceived in 1921, it was built by private citizens and completed in 1937. The trail traverses Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and Georgia.
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Featured Resources

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Tomorrows Child
Tomorrow's Child magazine offers insights and information that helps parents to feel confident that Montessori will prepare their children for the real world. It will help you understand and appreciate Montessori and apply it in your home.
Learning Styles: Reaching Everyone God Gave You to Teach
This book offers helpful and practical strategies about the different ways that kids acquire information and learn, and then use that knowledge. Kids' behavior is often tied to a particular learning style and understanding that fact will help parents respond to their child in ways that decrease frustration and increase success, especially in a homeschooling environment. 
Rhythms of Learning : What Waldorf Education Offers Children, Parents & Teachers (Vista Series, V. 4) (Vista Series, V. 4)
In numerous lectures and through teaching teachers for the first Waldorf school, Rudolf Steiner described and suggested methods of education based on the rhythmic unfolding of spirit, soul, and physiology in children as they grow. In each section of "Rhythms of Learning," Waldorf teacher Roberto Trostli introduces the reader to lectures on specific aspects of children's rhythms of development and how Waldorf education responds. We are shown how Waldorf teachers must, through their own inner capa...
Understanding Waldorf Education : Teaching from the Inside Out
Written by a teacher with more than 25 years of experience, this book offers a jargon-free view of Waldorf schools with their philosophy of the importance of a three-dimensional education. Through learning experiences that involve all of the senses, children use a variety of intelligences to develop thought, feeling, and intentional, purposeful activity. Whether you_re a Waldorf parent or teacher, or you just want to learn more about these innovative educational concepts, this book contains impo...
I Learn Better by Teaching Myself/Still Teaching Ourselves
Take a look at how a homeschooling mother learned to trust her children-and herself-to learn in new ways. Tag along on the journey from the elementary years through high school as this book explore the success and freedom of unstructured learning. These books are especially good for anyone wrestling with the question of "how much structure should there be in a homeschool?"