State Laws
Read the laws regulating home education in Connecticut and browse through the case law and legal opinions relating to those laws, along with government publications relating to homeschooling and summaries of the laws.
Summaries and Explanations of Connecticut Homeschooling Laws
How to Withdraw Your Child from School in Vermont

If you want to start homeschooling during the school year and your child is currently enrolled in a public or private school, HSLDA recommends that you formally withdraw your child from that school. If you are going to start homeschooling after the school year is over, and your child is considered enrolled for the following year, we recommend that you withdraw your child before the next school year begins, so that the school does not mark your child as absent or truant.

Notice of Intent: Filing Is Voluntary
The State Department of Education's C-14 Guidelines give two different messages -- in the Introduction and elsewhere it reads, "Suggested Procedure" and in section 3 it reads, "parents must file..." To add to the confusion, school officials often give misleading or false information when parents ask about homeschooling. Because the wording of the Guidelines is inconsistent and poorly written, school officials and parents may be unsure of their responsibilities and their rights.
Connecticut Home School Laws
The Home School Legal Defense Association provides a brief summary of the homeschooling laws in Connecticut. Includes a link to a legal analysis of laws relating to homeschooling in Connecticut.
How to Comply with Vermont's Homeschool Law

Vermont law specifically refers to homeschooling in 16 V.S.A. § 11(a)(21) and 16 V.S.A. § 166b. To homeschool under this statute, you’ll need to follow these guidelines. Necessary steps include sending in a written enrollment notice, submitting a narrative describing the content to be provided in each subject area, obtaining acknowledgement of compliance, teaching the required subjects and assessing your child annually. 

Law & Policy
In Connecticut there are two things homeschoolers need to understand; the law, and the Guidelines. The two sometimes cause confusion for people, and sometimes the Guidelines are mistaken for being law, but they are not law. The Guidelines are part of the Suggested Procedure on Home Instruction in CT. This analysis includes information on state laws, state guidelines, sample forms, and more.
Connecticut Homeschool Laws and Procedures
Summary of the laws pertaining to home education in Connecticut. Includes text of the laws and state Board of Education guidelines.
Compulsory School Age in Vermont

The laws in Vermont state that you must enroll your child in school from the day he or she turns 6 years old until he or she turns 16. This HSLDA article details the Vermont state compulsory school age regulations. 

Connecticut Homeschooling Guidelines
This is a listing of the guidelines issued by the Connecticut Department of Education regarding how they think the home education laws should be implemented.
Connecticut Statutes Pertaining to Home Education
Home School Laws from HSLDA
Find the laws pertaining to home education for all 50 states and U.S. territories.
An Act Concerning The Mandatory School Attendance Age (Public Act No. 00-157)
Public Act No. 00-157 (Mandatory School Attendance Age) changed the age under which a child is subject to compulsory attendance from sixteen to eighteen, effective July 1, 2001.
Connecticut Statute, Chapter 168, Section 10-184, 10-184a, 10-184b
The following are Connecticut Statues relating to home education: Section 10-184 (School Attendance and Employment of Children--Duties of Parents. School attendance age requirements.); Section 10-184a (Refusal of certain parents to consent to use of special education programs or services.); Section 10-184b (Waiver provisions not applicable to equivalent instruction authority of parents.)
An Act Concerning Revisions to the Education Statutes (94-245)
An Act Concerning Revisions to the Education Statutes (94-245) contains the following provisions: Special Education and Private School or Home Schooling. The act exempts students from the state's special education requirements, if their parents or guardians provide equivalent instruction at home or in a private school and refuse to consent to special education services for their children. Limitation on Commissioner's Waiver Authority. The act prohibits the education commissioner from waiving any law if doing so would limit parents' authority to provide for equivalent instruction for their children instead of having them attend public school.
Case Law and Legal Opinions
Pierce v. Society of the Sisters of the Holy Names of Jesus and Mary
In Pierce v. Society of the Sisters, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that "the fundamental theory of liberty upon which all governments of this Union repose excludes any general power of the state to standardize its children by forcing them to accept instruction from public teachers only. The child is not the creature of the state."
Featured Resources

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Handbook of Nature Study
A matchless handbook for decades, this classic work has been the natural history bible for countless teachers and others who seek information about their environment. Written originally for those elementary school teachers who knew little of common plants and animals, and even less about the earth beneath their feet and the skies overhead, this book is for the most part as valid and helpful today as it was when first written in 1911―and revised in the spirit of its authors by a group of naturali...
Educational Travel on a Shoestring : Frugal Family Fun and Learning Away from Home
Educational Travel on a Shoestring shows parents how they can help their children learn–and have a blast–while traveling. From researching destinations to sharing activities that both teach and entertain, this priceless guide offers practical information for parents who want to have more fun with their kids, build closer family ties, and enjoy richer educational experiences–all without spending a fortune.
Better Late Than Early: A New Approach to Your Child's Education
In this book, Raymond and Dorothy Moore look at the research behind learning styles for children. The message of slowing down and responding to your child's readiness is a welcome contrast to the common practice of pushing young children through the system. They conclude that the best environment for children to learn is at home. 
I Learn Better by Teaching Myself/Still Teaching Ourselves
Take a look at how a homeschooling mother learned to trust her children-and herself-to learn in new ways. Tag along on the journey from the elementary years through high school as this book explore the success and freedom of unstructured learning. These books are especially good for anyone wrestling with the question of "how much structure should there be in a homeschool?"
LeapPad Game - Mind Wars Interactive Game
Bring a friend and try this brand new way to play with your LeapPad! Travel around the board in this fast-paced, head-to-head game as you hit your buzzer before your friend can steal your question! Be the first to close all five windows and you will become the Mind Wars master and learn important 3rd-5th grade skills in math, language and fine arts, science, history, and geography!